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All cylinders containing Air Liquide gases are labeled, packaged and shipped in accordance with local and national requirements, as well as industry standards.

All cylinders containing Air Liquide gases are labeled, packaged and shipped in accordance with local and national requirements, as well as industry standards. Transportation label diamonds, regardless of color, indicate hazardous materials. Personnel handling any compressed gas should be familiar with the potential hazards before using the gas. In addition to the chemical hazards of compressed gases, hazards accompanying high-pressure or low temperature may also be present due to the physical state of the gas (i.e. liquefied or nonliquefied).

We also recommend to:

  • Educate personnel who handle compressed gases through discussion with a supervisor or knowledgeable coworker before beginning a new task.
  • Outline the actions necessary to complete any given job.
  • Address potential emergencies and corresponding measures necessary to safely avoid such emergencies.
  • Consider scenarios that could result in gas leaks or other emergencies in order to be fully prepared to react appropriately.

Compressed gas

Any nonflammable material or mixture having a pressure exceeding 41 psia (3 bar) at 70°F (21°C) in the container, or any flammable or poisonous material that is a gas at 70°F (21°C) and has a pressure of 14.7 psia (3 bar) or greater. Most compressed gases will not exceed 2,000 to 2,640 psig (138 to 182 bar), though some can go up to 6,000 psig (414 bar).

Nonliquefied compressed gas

A chemical or material other than gas in solution that, under the charged pressure, is entirely gaseous at a temperature of 70°F (21°C).

Liquefied compressed gas

A chemical or material that, under the charged pressure, is partially liquid at a temperature of 70°F (21°C).

Compressed gas in solution

A nonliquefied compressed gas that is dissolved in a solvent.